Salesforce Teams Up With Google, Cloudera And More To Bring Big Data To Its Analytics Cloud

Salesforce-waveanalytics-cloud

In the process of exploring Big Data Analyltics in the context of Information Technology Operations Analytics (ITOA) and my work with Yotta Data Enterprise Search, it has become clear that Salesforce, with the release of it’s Wave Analytics Cloud, has the potential to become a “player” in the Big Data Analytics space.

In an article published on Forbes.com on May 28, 2015 by Alex Konrad, titled, “Salesforce Teams Up With Google, Cloudera And More To Bring Big Data To Its Analytics Cloud,”, Mr. Konrad states that, “Salesforce announced partnerships with six big data players–Google, Cloudera, Hortonworks, New Relic, Informatica and Trifacta–that it believes will help solve the “last mile” problem for using vast quantities of data. Sales and services customers at those vendors who want an easier way to look at real business problems will now have access to Salesforce’s cloud offering, while customers of Marc Benioff’s cloud customer relationship management company can choose from several data management tools.”

This is really great news for emerging Salesforce.com consulting practices like Cloud Elevate Solutions out of Houston Texas.  Ted Mayo, Cloud Elevate Solutions founder stated, “Being able to identify, harvest and analyze the vast amount of data that our client base is faced with on a daily basis and leverage the results of that analysis with actionable customer interaction is huge.”  “We are in the business of helping out clients build better and more productive relationships with their client bases and therefore, the more pertinent data that we can access, analyze and provide to our clients the better,” continued Mr. Mayo.

“The expansion of Big Data Analytics to additional platforms like salesforce.com that need to find, harvest and consume vast amounts of unstructured data is great news for emerging search platforms like YottaSearch,” stated Brad Mixner, Founder of Yotta Data Technology. “No matter where it is, if you need to find and harvest data, we can do it,” continued Mr. Mixner.

From multiple different perspectives across the entire Analytics  ecosystem, it looks like Salesforce and it’s expanding list of partners is a good thing.  I for one  plan to keep an eye on how this new offering progresses and will keep my readers up-to-date with any and all news.

The full text of Mr. Knorad’s article is as follows:

Six months after announcing its Wave analytics cloud at its annual Dreamforce conference, Salesforce has built up some partnerships with big data companies to give the product some teeth.

Salesforce announced partnerships with six big data players–Google, Cloudera, Hortonworks, New Relic, Informatica and Trifacta–that it believes will help solve the “last mile” problem for using vast quantities of data. Sales and services customers at those vendors who want an easier way to look at real business problems will now have access to Salesforce’s cloud offering, while customers of Marc Benioff’s cloud customer relationship management company can choose from several data management tools.

The problem, Salesforce executive Keith Bigelow told reporters in a briefing on Wednesday, is that with the amount of available data doubling at the pace of Moore’s Law, there’ll be 44 trillion gigabytes of data available to companies by 2020. They’ll struggle to analyze 1% of that, Salesforce projects.

“We have the opportunity to finally bring this together,” Bigelow says. “That means the number one CRM company partnering with the biggest partners in big data.”

For Salesforce’s cohort of partners, working with the company could open up new types of less data-driven customers who can find their products more accessible. Google’s big data customers typically work with billions of rows of data, says Adam Massey, Google’s director of cloud ecosystem. Given the expertise required to work with that data on its own, “a lot of projects don’t really get off the ground.” Cloudera’s Clarke Patterson went so far as to call the deal “a match made in heaven” for its ability to surface up insights from Cloudera’s data.

Of course, the big data companies work with a range of partners to try to make their services reach more customers. Hortonworks, for example, says it works with 1,000 partners already, including SAP, Microsoft and SAS. But working with Salesforce can prove significant given the large customer bases many already share with Benioff’s operation. This type of partnership can make them happier; extra customers picked up from one service to the other would be a bonus. At Informatica, chief product officer Anil Chakravarthy tells Forbes that Wave is attractive because it is tied closely to Salesforce’s other business applications and is simple to use for the non-data scientist. “We have a tremendous established customer base in the Salesforce ecosystem, and anticipate that they will use Wave,” he says.

For now, turning on the big data spigot should add some substance to Wave, a tool that Salesforce president Keith Block told Forbes earlier in May is gaining traction with big customers like Barclays and GE. While Benioff and his team have pitched Wave as easier to use than dedicated analytics products, its capabilities had appeared a bit light by comparison at their October launch.

With Google, Cloudera and the rest on board, Salesforce’s analytics offerings have gotten a major upgrade. Now the next question is whether the service has enough to offer to change the mind of a new customer.

About Charles Skamser
Charles Skamser is an internationally recognized technology sales, marketing and product management leader with over 25 years of experience in Information Governance, eDiscovery, Machine Learning, Computer Assisted Analytics, Cloud Computing, Big Data Analytics, IT Automation and ITOA. Charles is the founder and Senior Analyst for eDiscovery Solutions Group, a global provider of information management consulting, market intelligence and advisory services specializing in information governance, eDiscovery, Big Data analytics and cloud computing solutions. Previously, Charles served in various executive roles with disruptive technology start ups and well known industry technology providers. Charles is a prolific author and a regular speaker on the technology that the Global 2000 require to manage the accelerating increase in Electronically Stored Information (ESI). Charles holds a BA in Political Science and Economics from Macalester College.